What to do with a Royal Commission?

I am a person with no clinical or “care” background. But after almost forty years in senior management and executive roles across the spectrum of health and aged care – particularly aged care – I have gathered some insights into the nature of care being provided throughout our care services.

And before I suggest anything more, let me say this – my view is that if the major hospitals around Australia – public and private – were put under the same scrutiny and regulatory framework that residential aged care services are for the quality and accreditation of services that are provided in and through them, we would see hospitals falling into sanctions.

I am of the view that we have an aged care system that is too focused on beating the regulatory compliance framework as opposed to funding and providing appropriate levels of care and support to all clients.

On the one hand I am an incredibly strong advocate of high quality services accompanied with some form of accreditation. On the other hand, I believe we have an aged care accreditation system that we can really ill afford.

It underpins inadequate funding levels that cannot provide enough resources for many providers to meet the expressed needs of care for residents. In the same way, our community aged care system is creaking because we cannot provide enough funding for the community aged care packages assessed by the Australian Government as needed by our citizens.

I hear staff all over Australia clamouring, not always for more wages, but for more pairs of hands to do the work. To do more than the system underpins…To go the extra mile… To sit for a few minutes when that is what the client really wants, and really needs… To spend time hearing what the real story is…

To quote a UK study of its Home Help services from the early 1980s – “Too much Charring and not enough Chatting”.

I could ask the question – Which provides more care, the Chatting or the Charring? Neither is necessarily more correct, but often we cannot even get to the question. The bureaucratisation of aged care is with us and the paperwork must be done at our own peril.

I have colleagues that will not (at this time) support minimum staff ratios. Quite rightly they see them as an un-affordable cost under the current funding methodology. How sad that we do not all see them as providing perhaps the single greatest opportunity right now to see a reduction in abuse, and a reduction in short cuts in care. How sad that we do not see minimum staff ratios as an opportunity to support our staff and see a visual improvement in the increased in quality of care. But implementation of minimum staff ratios will be quite costly.

I am still of the view that in Australia we have one the best aged care systems in the world. But for a range of reasons it is creaking.

Let’s all is to consider how much of a cost is there to stop, take stock, and with the next round of changes, really consider the long term impact of where we are heading and fight more intensely to protect the rights of those who are dependent upon us, the general public, for their livelihoods?

And who knows – the Royal Commission might investigate several inter services aspects around care of our elderly folks? One matter that I have discussed for the past decade is how much more proactive care we can provide in our aged care facilities, that might actually have a positive, beneficial impact on our national health and hospital care services.

In the past twenty years we have missed the opportunity to think outside the square with respect to fixing major State based hospitals. As a “cohort” of patients, frail elderly people are significant and frequent users of hospital services. Perhaps if we reviewed the aged care sector and its inherent possibilities we might find better solutions to our hospital problems.

Chatfield’s cartoon below was first published by me in December 2010 in an article containing many of the words in the commentary above. Not much has changed it seems!

To fix hospitals, first fix aged care!

I get it… Do You?

Elephant in the room?

So, what is the elephant in the room with aged care at the moment?

In a report released Friday 17 August 2018 that showed a recent increase in home care funding for elderly care recipients, there was a worrying trend in demand versus ability to provide that needed care.

That is, despite the growth in older people desiring home care services, the number of home care packages assigned (or available) is simply not keeping up with demand.

At 31 March 2018, according to figures only released on 17 August 2018, the queue waiting to receive a package had risen to 108,456 people.  That is an increase of 3,854 on those waiting at 31 December 2017.  Not only that , but just over half of all those in the queue have been assigned a package at a lower level than their needs require.  Remember this is all based on the Australian Government’s own approved needs assessment, and allocation of packages.

Contemporaneously we have demographers projecting the number of residential aged care places required to be built/developed is now at about 75,000 by 2025.  That is only eight years away.

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Why corporate governance is important.

The word governance may well have been used by Chaucer in 14th century England, but the phrase ‘corporate governance’ has only been commonly used since the 1980s.

Major corporate failures such as Enron, WorldCom, HIH, the dot.com crisis, the global financial crisis, and the Royal Commissions into institutional abuse of children and the banking sector, have increased governance expectations.

The community requires corporations to improve the way in which corporate governance is practiced.

That is, more is expected from companies behaving as good citizens.

Although not a legal term, ‘corporate governance’ does carry the sense of needing to be defined. It regularly arises in actions or Commissions as something lacking in practice.

Yet the concept of corporate governance has struggled to have a single definition. Early definitions were based around corporate governance being the ‘system by which companies are directed and controlled’ (Cadbury Report, 1992; King, 1994).

The Australian Stock Exchange recently broadened the scope of the concept of corporate governance to ‘the framework of rules, relationships, systems, and processes within and by which authority is exercised and controlled in corporations’.

Similarly, the G20/OECD principles discuss how the monitoring of performance against structure of organisational objectives can deliver better
governance outcomes.

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Minimum – What Ratios?

I have never been a great advocate for regulated minimum staffing ratios, but prefer regulation of the things that are really important around provision of care services to the people, our care recipients.  If you like, having enough of the right people at the right time, and not just to fulfil a compliance requirement around the number of pairs of hands.

In completing this Review my own views around staffing, quality of care, industrial considerations and the like have changed – for the better.  It remains to be seen if those with the capacity to make an even more profound difference to improve care outcomes for frail, vulnerable, mainly elderly recipients of care – the Australian Government and Parliament – will actually choose to support those whom we serve.

Introduction

It seems that in Australia rarely a month goes by where the public is not informed of another aged care failing.  There is wide spread public perception of a lack of care and low quality of life for residents within the aged care system.  The call for greater regulation of minimum staffing standards and additional funds to meet them is prominent but seems to fall on deaf ears of the Australian Government.

Without residential aged care provision, residents would likely be inpatients in State based hospitals at several times the daily cost of care of a residential aged care facility.  However, the proportion of funds spent on care and service provision should be acquitted on what really matters – the care of people.

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Shaky Foundation: Where is residential care today? 

I have been tracking various residential aged care data and some interesting comparison figures for two decades now since the Aged Care Act came into being in 1997.Please allow me to say right upfront – collecting relevant and appropriate data from indices can be difficult and not always truly comparable.

The data represented below is purely to make us think, and perhaps identify for providers at least, why it seems to have become so much more difficult to maintain a high quality residential aged care service today to people with more pressing multiple morbidities than ever before.

Clearly, by comparison, our funding foundation has worsened over the past twenty or so years.

Residential Aged Care Comparators:

Some description of the various indices follows:

Continue reading “Shaky Foundation: Where is residential care today? “

Free Flu Shots at Braemar

Some time back during one of our regular Braemar senior leadership meetings in 2017, we decided to take the lead in protecting our residents from influenza by offering complementary flu vaccines not just for our staff and residents, but also volunteers and the families of those in our care.

This week, free vaccinations were available at Braemar Cooinda and Braemar Village, while next week we will be providing the vaccines to those at Braemar House.

Here’s the latest instalment from artist Jason Chatfiled which was used as the banner on the day.

This move predated the recently announced Government plan to mandate all aged care providers to provide free flu vaccines to their staff. It was a decision we took as we felt it was an effective way to help reduce the risk of influenza entering the aged care environment.

The idea to expand the service to families and volunteers was developed by the Braemar team under the direction of Renee Reid, General Manager of Workforce. When chatting to Renee, she expressed the team’s desire to ‘meet and exceed best practice levels to reduce the risk of our health and care professionals contracting flu or passing it onto our residents,’ which to me demonstrates a commitment to resident health and wellbeing across the organisation.

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Easter Message 2018

Hi Folks,

I might just be getting old, but not a year goes by that I don’t think more deeply about Easter. Don’t get me wrong, I really love Christmas, and from the perspective of being a follower of Jesus, that is obviously a very special milestone of my faith. But Easter … Easter is the cornerstone event of my relationship with Jesus Christ.

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Reflections

In late January and early February 2018 I had the privilege of joining the Global Conference on Integrated Care (“GCIC”) in Singapore.  I am delighted to say that for me this was the most beneficial conference that I have attended since my re-connection to the aged care sector in August 2016.

Every nation represented at the Conference shared information about their significantly growing healthcare budget and rapidly ageing population. All nations have health and aged care systems that were created for a previous generation. They are not designed for the massive ageing population growth that require more and more health, social and aged care services.

As often as I remind others of the difficulties aged care providers, their workforce and clients are confronted with, I remind myself that we belong to a bigger system of health and social care provision.

Many parts of that system attract what seems to us, by comparison, to be outrageous funding.  Maintenance care only in a hospital costs approximately $1,200 per day.  A day of care in an intensive care unit costs $6,000 plus per day.  That is not to say of course that these services are not important and desperately needed.

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Direction of Australian Aged Care?

Hi Folks,

I am about to board a plane for Singapore where this week I will be speaking at the GCIC 2018 conference on integrated care.

My topic will look at where the industry may go next in its clinical governance responsibilities. I thought this was interesting to look at twenty years on from the introduction of the Aged Care Act in 1997.

I will share my full paper next week and explore some further ideas following the conference. In the Essay, I have strived to briefly describe the history of residential aged care in Australia and show how economic drivers that largely determine the funding of care may also be diminishing the clinical appropriateness of care. This can place care recipients, providers, and program funders alike potentially at risk of failure of service in financially constrained times.

Continue reading “Direction of Australian Aged Care?”