How Is Your Organisational Strategy Shaping Up for the 2020-21 Year and Beyond?

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I am not sure how you have been managing your time during these past seven weeks.  Because I am now “semi-retired”, I have taken the opportunity to read and refresh my earlier learnings over the past almost forty years on leadership, management, and strategy, while focusing on completing some studies in executive and leadership coaching.

What has struck me is that in this time of turbulent change, particularly in human services delivery right now where the impact of COVID-19 is taking its toll, is that many theories about leadership, management, strategy, and human resources management, actually have not changed, and likely do not need to.  Sometimes the “old” fundamentals are as reliable as granite …

In his now famous, and dated article, Henry Mintzberg defined as a plan, ploy, pattern, position or perspective (Mintzberg, 1987, The Strategy Concept I: Five Ps For Strategy). Mintzberg described:

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COVID-19 – What more needs to be done in our aged care system?

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Stop the world – I want to get off  is the title of a musical created in the 1960s.

Some 55 years later as we become globally enmeshed in a pandemic the like of which none of us has experienced before, one could be forgiven for wanting to shout those words from the roof tops.

I don’t need to remind you of the enormity of the task ahead of every organisation in every industry sector – particularly those in a sector I am so fond of and have given over half of my career to.  I won’t belabour the size of the task ahead of you.  But I do want to ask the rhetorical questions in this group – are we doing enough in our aged care sector to make an impact?

For providers – if you could get hold of adequate supplies of personal protective clothing and equipment, are you considering gloving, gowning, and masking all your front-line care staff?  Are you having a skilled Registered Nurse meet and greet every visitor and taking a temperature prior to allowing a visitor, contractor, family member, Aged Care Quality and Safety Commission staff member enter the facility?

For the Australian government – Department of Health and Aged Care Quality and Safety Commission – have you increased the ACFI rate per resident per day, or introduced a coronavirus supplement to cover the cost of additional medical supplies, staffing supplies, and loss of revenue when facilities empty due to untimely death of residents?  Have you considered the financial risk and impact of failure of the RAD scheme?

Why these specific questions?

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Six Attributes of “Leadership”

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This is likely a longer piece than usual, but I think important as we all consider the place of leadership mid-way through the term of appointment of the Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality and Safety.

I have been asked many times over the years I have served as a CEO, to define leadership.  There are of course quotes such as “It is an art, rather than a science”.  Or “You can tell if you are a leader when there is someone following behind you”.  What seems to be true is that you are not born to be a leader, and leadership is not achieved from a one day development training session.  However, we can grow as leaders every day – and indeed we must.  And leadership is about people, whilst management is about tasks and things.

But even those small truisms above do not do justice to this thing called leadership.  Most of us can likely recall our own examples of where we have experienced poor, or ineffective leadership.  We may even now be wincing as we read, recognising our own lack of skills in a leadership role at some time in the past.  We can also likely recall and acknowledge some fine experience of leadership that was such a joy to be party to.

Good leadership is a thing of beauty to experience.  Much like a diamond.  A diamond has so many qualities and when cut well, is a thing of beauty to behold.  It is hardly surprising that “diamonds are a girl’s best friend”.  As the following picture shows, even a so called six sided diamond has much more to offer than the “simple” six sided cuts.

So it is with leadership.

I provide below just six sides, or attributes, of leadership that I believe if practiced (well) every day will not only assist us to be better performing leaders but will drive better performance in our organisations.  I am certain we can all accept that leadership is more complex than these six, but these are a sound foundation.  The attributes are provided in alphabetical order only for convenience:

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Welcome to 2020

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6 January 2020

No matter where and how we are involved in our Australian aged care sector, 2019 was a tough year.  The sector ended 2019 with one word ringing in our ears – Neglect – being the title of the Interim Report from the Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality and Safety.  What a tough end to 2019!

How do we emerge from 2019 into a brighter and stronger 2020 given that the Royal Commission continues to march on?  How do we turn Neglect into respect and rise above the negative views of all that 2019 revealed about our sector?

I suggest that we should at least consider the following seven factors:

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Submission to Royal Commission

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The following link points to the substantive comments I made in a recent submission to the Royal Commission on Aged Care Quality and Safety.  As a very recently retired Chief Executive in the aged care sector, with some 37 years of continual involvement in aged care related matters, I feel I can comfortably comment upon my own research into matters around minimum levels of staff. Additionally, and importantly how, I believe, the aged care sector has been left in a quandary as to how best to navigate through these troubled times due to funding constraints placed on (at least) the residential aged care.

You can read the entire Submission here.

Nice chatting

Staff Ratios – Royal Commission Research Paper

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I have read with interest late last week the very freshly released Royal Commission research paper (1) into aged care staffing requirements, and the shortfall in funding needed to raise the staffing mix and levels to appropriately care for the average residential aged care service consumer.  

The following excerpt from the recommendations paints a picture of what residents, families, advocates, and indeed some providers have been saying for some time – the level of service provision (staffing) in residential aged care in Australia is substandard.  

My conclusion is that because that level of provision is so strongly associated with the operating funding mechanism, the funding mechanism for care is equally substandard:

“more than half (57.6%) of Australian residents receive care in aged care homes that have unacceptable levels of staffing (1 and 2 stars).

To bring staffing levels up to 3 stars would require an increase of 37.3% more staff hours in those facilities. This translates into an additional of 20% in total care staff hours across Australia.

We have not limited our analysis to determining the additional resources required to bring facilities up to an acceptable level. We have also provided an indication of the additional resource requirements that are required to deliver staffing levels consistent with good practice and best practice care.

For all residents to receive at least 4 stars (what we consider good practice) requires an overall increase of 37.2% in total care staffing while 5 stars (best practice) care would require an overall increase of 49.4% in total care staffing.” (2)

As you are probably well aware, I am the CEO of Braemar Presbyterian Care (“Braemar”). To put our services into perspective, since I joined Braemar in March 2017 we have been increasing hours per resident per day to a level that is close to the current national average as recorded by the StewartBrown benchmarking service (3) reporting.  And, as far as is reasonable, we have been improving our subsidy income to match the staffing.  But that recurrent income is not enough.  

According to this research paper, prepared for the Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality and Safety, less than 3 star level of staffing is unacceptable, while a 4 star staffing is good practice, and 5 star staffing is best practice.  Yet 57.6% of residents receive less than 3 star (unacceptable) staffing and only 1.4% receive best practice staffing.

How is this translated into the care of our elders? 

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The Truth Is Out There!

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Over the past several years I have written often on how much funding I believe the aged care sector has been short-changed by a range of political and bureaucratic decisions over.  Aged care funding is not adequate to meet the health care needs of Australia’s frail elderly, vulnerable, care recipients.  My comments apply across residential aged care funding and home/community care package funding alike.  You can review some of my previous articles in the footnotes below. [1] [2]

Patricia Sparrow, Chief Executive of the not-profit aged care peak body Aged and Community Services Australia (ACSA), commentating recently on home care packages, lamented the lack of preparedness and capability of our aged care system, saying “Until we see adequate long-term planning for the structural and funding issues, Australia won’t be able to fully address the needs of older Australians”.[3]  Sean Rooney, Chief Executive of Leading Aged Services Australia, similarly recently commented that the “aged care system needs adequate funding to be sustainable and meet the needs of seniors” and called for an additional $3 billion to “improve the viability of the sector”.[4]

Just this week I was briefed about the outcomes of a very recent Faster Horses Inside Aged Care Report (2019) of perceptions around aged care in Australia. I recommend this review to all readers of this blog. Reviewing response from over 1,500 people from a cross section of metropolitan centres, the response to two specific questions piqued my interest.

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Aged Care Indexation

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I am going to assume that most people reading this article will be aware that there is currently a Royal Commission reviewing matters of Quality and Safety in Aged Care.  Among other things, that Commission is inquiring into matters where poor and substandard care have been provided to residents in residential aged care and to care recipients in home and community-based care.

Where there have been findings of substandard care, all providers in the aged care sector should stand resolutely with care recipients and be highly critical of the events that took place to permit such poor care being delivered.  However, without wanting to escape from the responsibility of being a provider of aged care I do want to highlight again the dilemma that providers find themselves in desiring to provide the best care that they can.

One of the threads arising through the Royal Commission Hearings, and for some time prior to the Commission commencing has been a call for a higher staff ratio in care services being delivered.  

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Living with Dignity, Dying in Comfort

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Hi Folks,

Braemar Presbyterian Care is offering a free community event for local people of Perth, who are interested in learning more about palliative care.

The team have developed a Living with Dignity, Dying in Comfort information evening, which will take place on 22 May from 5:30PM at Braemar House, located at 10 Windsor Road, East Fremantle.

I spoke recently with our Professional Standards, Quality and Risk Specialist, Bernadette Samura, who has a lot of experience in this area – having previously managed Braemar House.

Bernadette was quick to point out that palliative care is far more than just end-of-life care, and that it is essential to challenge the myths and stigmas around palliative care. ‘We want people to openly discuss it as a normal part of their future planning,’ she told me. It is Braemar’s desire to ensure everyone involved in this quality of life process is very much part of the care and friendship philosophy that can add so much to quality of life.

The evening involves a keynote presentation from Bethesda Hospital’s Clinical Nurse Manager, Ed Gaudion, as well as exhibits showcasing various care approaches. It is a free event, and is open to members of the community, their families with loved ones in care facilities, those planning to relocate to residential aged care, as well as anyone keen to learn more about palliative care.

Hope to see you there,

Wayne.

Note: The Living with Dignity, Dying in Comfort information evening will take place on Wednesday 22 May at Braemar House in East Fremantle, from 5:30-7PM. Coffee and light refreshments will be provided. Anyone interested in attending this session can find out more details by contacting 08 6279 3654